LÁSZLÓ TÖRÖK

Born 20 April 1948 in Budapest, on Százados Road, into a working class family. He received his high school diploma in 1966, and following two years in the military, he was employed until 1970 by the Hungarian Film Laboratory (with the assistance of his uncle, cinematographer Vidor Török). Here, József Heffele had a strong influence on the development of his visual approach. Subsequently, for three years he worked in various divisions of the Hungarian Wire Service (MTI). In 1975, he took the exam for professional photographers, and later he also completed the school of the Hungarian Press Association.

In 1972, he exploded into recognition within Hungarian and international photography with his picture, entitled Family: he received the World Press Photo Golden Eye.
He worked as a photojournalist, then photo editor at the Tourism Propaganda and Publishing Company, while he was made a member of the Hungarian Association of Photographers (1979), and also took an active part in the work of the First Creative Group and the Danube Bend Photo Club.
In 1991, he established the Pajta Gallery in Salföld, where he arranges exhibitions and nude photography workshops – thus, he is an important figure on the Hungarian photography scene.
His photographic oeuvre was recognised in 1989 with a Balázs Béla Award, and in 1993 he received the Kodak Prize in Düsseldorf.

He has had solo exhibitions – more than twenty so far – outside of Hungary, in Spain, Finland, Italy, Germany, Lithuania, and in the former Yugoslavia.
His album, entitled Alterations, was published in 1983 as volume 4 of the JAK-pamphlets, in whose preface Tibor Zalán wrote the following about László Török’s artwork: “His creative method is at once his special relationship to reality, as well. He attempts to pull in the rift between… the expressed and what is still to be expressed… He works with few elements; among them, the nude female body, the stylised and homogenous background – or crumpled drapery – attain a dominant role in his world”.
After his female nudes placed in ironic environments, blurred, made with long exposition times and in blue tones, with the aid of poet Károly Bari, his series, Gypsies was made, and his pictures inspired by literature, entitled Quotations, rendered his artworks recognisable at all times to those who pay just a bit of attention.
He produces his photo-artworks for the most part with a unique monochromatic technique, and often with montage. Károly Kincses writes about his creative attitude: “He speculates, ruminates, directs, plans, and only then are his pictures born”.

His works are held in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, at the Bradford TV-Film Foundation, at the Hungarian Museum of Photography, in the Contemporary Photography Collection of the National Széchényi Library, and in the Körmendi-Csák Collection of 20th Century Hungarian Photography.

 

(c) László Török

(c) László Török

(c) László Török

(c) László Török

(c) László Török

(c) László Török